New Planet Found, Smaller Than Earth, Orbiting Distant Star


Thirty-three light-years away, in the constellation Leo the lion, astronomers say they have found a world considerably smaller than Earth, orbiting a dim red-dwarf star.
That's something to think about. While scientists have confirmed the existence of more than 700 so-called exoplanets since 1995, most of them have been giant -- many considerably larger than Jupiter. This new world, say the researchers who found it, may be only 5,200 miles across, about two thirds as large as Earth.
"People have been picking at the low-hanging fruit, since Jupiter-sized planets are easier to see," said Kevin Stevenson, the young researcher at the University of Central Florida who led the team making the find. "Now we're really pushing the limits of what our telescopes can find."
The newly found world is, for now, called UCF-1.01, and Stevenson and his colleagues found it with NASA's Spitzer space telescope in Earth orbit. It orbits a star called GJ 436. They spent a year watching it to confirm that it was indeed a distant world. They are publishing their find online Thursday in the Astrophysical Journal.
UCF-1.01 is probably not a very nice place. Stevenson and his group calculated that it whips around its host star in only 1.4 Earth-days, at a distance of about 1.6 million miles (we're 93 million miles from our sun). Temperatures on its surface probably exceed 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, raising the possibility that some of it is molten, covered in lava. Any atmosphere would have boiled away long ago, said the researchers.
They could not see it directly -- its sun is nothing but a dot in a telescope -- but they could see a tiny dip in the star's brightness as the disc of UCF-1.01 passed in front of it. For now, they cannot even calculate its mass; current technology is not good enough for a reliable number.
Nobody will be launching a mission to UCF-1.01 anytime soon; there are other worlds, including moons of Jupiter and Saturn, that look much more promising as homes for living things. Still, the find suggests that if this world could be detected, others -- perhaps in the so-called habitable zones around their host stars -- may soon be found as well.
"The discovery was completely by accident," said Stevenson in a telephone interview with ABC News. They were looking at another, much larger planet orbiting the same star, "and there were these spurious signals we could not explain."

Anthony Weiner's Spouse Huma Abedin: Better Kind of 'Good Wife'

He sexted with porn stars and constituents, lost his job and possibly his career, all while his wife was pregnant. So why did Huma Abedin stay with Anthony Weiner? That's the obvious question hurled at every woman who has ever stayed with a scandalized politician.

But does it really matter? Love, loyalty,and a six-month-old son could all be legitimate reasons. More interesting is how Abedin has chosen to move forward in her marriage--by taking charge.

"It took a lot of work to get to where we are today, but I want people to know we're a normal family," Abedin tells People magazine in her first interview since the scandal broke.

When the scandalized politician is dad

The magazine's latest issue, out Friday, is likely to focus more on the couple's restored family life than Weiner's history of unsavory texts and subsequent cover-ups. If it's a strategic attempt to get her husband's career back on track, it's a clever one.

"Anthony has spent every day since trying to be the best dad and husband he can be… I'm proud to be married to him," she says. And yes, he does "all the laundry."

In Abedin comes a new brand of "The Good Wife," an outdated term that's come to imply pet-like obedience for the sake of salvaging a husband's career.

If anything, her political prospects are burning brighter. She's also the family breadwinner, while dad's on diaper duty for their 6-month-old son Jordan. As deputy chief of staff for Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, her role has been under the microscope ever since Weiner's fall from grace.

Can Anthony Weiner's career be saved?
Right now she's the one weathering political criticism, and quite well. After Michele Bachmann accused Abedin of having influential ties to the Muslim Brotherhood, John McCain vehemently came to Abedin's defense, slamming the allegations and calling Weiner's wife an "honorable woman, a dedicated American and a loyal public servant." Lindsay Graham and Ed Rollins also lent their support, along with a Facebook group called I Stand With Huma.

The timing of the People article couldn't be better. There's no better way for Weiner to save face than by standing by the woman who stood by him. It's a tactic that worked to restore Bill Clinton's reputation and gain support for Hillary, Abedin's long-time boss.

Like Hillary, she's come too far to be taken down by her husband's mistakes, but that doesn't mean she's prepared to throw her personal life under the bus for public approval.

Even if the People magazine article doesn't re-establish Weiner as a trustworthy candidate, it may foster Abedin's political future. (And when your husband's out of a job, somebody's got to earn the living.)
"That would be a dramatic first step worth celebrating," writes The New York Times' KJ Dell'Antonia,
With Weiner's return to the public eye, it's her career in the spotlight, not his. Meanwhile, the debate over a woman's loyalty to a cheating husband is falling by the wayside. If anything, Abedin's past year captaining her family through murky waters proves it takes just as much strength to stand by a scandalized partner as it does to leave him.

How to browse the web anonymously

Think your online activities are private? Think again.
Not only are your surfing sessions tracked by websites, search engines and social networks, but often your Internet service provider (ISP), web browser, government and potentially hundreds of online tracking companies.
Whether it's to collect valuable (read: sellable) marketing data or prevent terrorist activity, movie piracy or kiddie porn, everything you think you're doing privately in the comfort of your home is anything but private.
But just because you want to spend time online anonymously doesn't mean you're a cybercriminal or have something to hide. Not only do regular folks want privacy, but remaining anonymous can also protect yourself from malicious types out to steal your identity for financial gain — from spammers and scammers alike.
And so there are a few things you can do to reduce the odds every click is tracked, archived and shared. The following are a few suggestions on where to start.
Smart software
How does Facebook know to show you ads for your local gym, supermarket or college? This is because your computer's unique Internet Protocol (IP) address, assigned by your ISP, reveals your geographical whereabouts. Even if your computer generates a different IP address every time you boot up or log online, this number (e.g. 220.165.119.12) can still tell of your general location.
And so there are many different solutions that can hide your Internet connection, allowing you to remain anonymous while online.
Some are websites, such as free "online proxy servers" that conceal your identity — simply point the web address (URL) to the proxy server and surf right from their website (check out proxy.org for a list of great options).

Others prefer Virtual Private Network (VPN) software that encrypts your online sessions. The browser-independent Hotspot Shield from AnchorFree, for example — available for Windows, Macs, iPhone and Android — channels all web activities through a personal VPN and secures all Internet communications by turning all HTTP traffic into the safer HTTPS (which is what your bank uses for a safe connection).
Free to use but with more features packed into the "elite" version ($29.95), Hotspot Shield is ideal for email and instant messaging, too, and reduces the likelihood of identity theft because you're not leaving a digital footprint -- including cyber-snoopers and rogue connections at Wi-Fi hotspots, hotels, airports, and so on.

Samsung Galaxy S III review


Samsung’s Galaxy line of Android phones can arguably be credited for bringing Android to the masses and amongst the many models that Samsung released under the Galaxy brand, the Galaxy S II holds a very special position not just for Samsung but for a lot of it’s users as well. It defined Samsung as the best Android device manufacturer and won countless awards for being the best device of last year. Today we look at the follow up to the Galaxy S II, unsurprisingly titled the Galaxy S III and see if Samsung has managed to create a true successor to it’s phenomenal device.
Packaging
Our review unit of the Samsung Galaxy S III arrived in a very plain looking blue box with Samsung Galaxy S III etched on top. For someone who doesn’t know much about Samrtphones, they’d think that the Galaxy S III is a most ordinary device based on the packaging. The unit is available in two colors- blue and white and I recieved the former version, I think white looks nicer. Other than the main phone, Samsung bundles the customary headphones and USB cable with charger plug along with a quickstart guide and warranty information.
Build quality amp; design
Thin is certainly in and the Galaxy S III shows us that with it’s incredibly slim porfile. Measuring 136.6 x 70.6 x 8.6 mm and weighing just 130g, Samsung maximizes the screen space by equipping the S III with a huge 4.8' screen in a size that is not too much bigger than other devices with smaller screens while at the same time being thinner and lighter. The following picture compares the S III to the Galaxy Nexus, also a device manufactured by Samsung.
Unlike the iPhone 4S or the HTC One X, the Samsung Galaxy S III doesn’t exude that premium fit and finish and instead of glass or carbon-fiber, you end up with a very plastic finish that tries to give off a metallic effect. That’s not to say that the design is bad and honestly, I think you’ll end up with lesser damage and heartache were you to drop the S III instead of the other devices, but nevertheless, when everyone else presenting premium finishes on their devices, the S III stands out like a sore thumb. This is especially felt when you remove the back cover and notice how thin and flimsy it feels.
Around the device, you have volume buttons on the left side and a power/lock button on right. A 3.5mm jack sits on top while the bottom has a micro USB connector. The back cover comes off and reveals spaces for a microSD card as well as a micro SIM card. The back side also houses the speaker phone and the main 8MP camera while the front has an additional camera and a notification LED above the screen and a home button below it along with two touch buttons for back and menu.
The Galaxy Nexus, showed Google’s concept for an ICS device and it’s interesting to see none of the top tier manufacturers following Google’s footsteps in ditching hard buttons with onscreen ones. Samsung has chosen to use the back and menu buttons alongside the home button and honestly, I’m not sure if this is a good idea as it creates inconsistencies and to some extent, fragmentation. To give you an example, the menu button is now onscreen for most ICS based Android devices but you don't see that button on the Samsung Galaxy S III. Also the back button is located to the right of the home button but my personal preference would have been on the left side as that’s where you generally see a back button on your browser or an onscreen button.
Screen, Specs and Benchmarks
The 4.8' screen size of the Samsung Galaxy S III is the second biggest sized screen I’ve seen in a phone (Galaxy Note, also by Samsung, takes that honor.) Sadly it’s a step back in technology and unlike the stunning Super AMOLED Plus screen that we saw on the Galaxy Note, the Galaxy S III uses the pentile based non plus version of the screen that is not as vibrant.
According to Samsung's spokesperson, it's because those blue sub-pixels that are absent on Super AMOLED displays degrade faster than their red and green allies. With the aim of keeping its phones healthily glowing for at least 18 months, it made the decision to go with the Pentile formation. That’s not to say that it’s a bad screen but it’s not one of the key selling points for Samsung as it has traditionally been and displays like the SLCD one found on the HTC One X look as impressive, or possibly even a tad bit better than the S III. I also found the screen very faded when using it outdoors under the UAE sunlight and had to crank the brightness to full be read the screen properly.
If speed is what you’re looking for, you won’t find a faster phone than the Samsung Galaxy S III. Based on the Exynos 4212 chipset with a Quad-core 1.4 GHz Cortex-A9 based CPU and the Mali-400MP GPU, the Galaxy S III smokes the competition when it comes to benchmarks.

Samsung Galaxy S III
HTC One X
Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Price
AED
AED
AED

Size
136.6 x 70.6 x 8.6 mm
134.4 x 69.9 x 8.9 mm
135.5 x 67.9 x 8.9 mm

Weight
133g
130g
145g

Screen Size
4.8'
4.7'
4.65'

Resolution
720 x 1280 (306 ppi)
720 x 1280 (312 ppi)
720 x 1280 (216 ppi)

CPU
Exynos 4212 Quad Core 1.4Ghz
Nvidia Tegra 3 Quad Core 1.5GHz
TI OMAP 4460 Dual Core 1.2GHz

RAM
1GB
1GB
1GB

Storage
16/32/64GB
32GB
16GB

Connectivity
HSDPA, 21 Mbps
Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0
HSDPA, 21 Mbps
Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0
HSDPA, 21 Mbps
Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n
Bluetooth 3.0

OS
Android 4.0
Android 4.0
Android 4.1 (4.1 soon)

Added UI
TouchWiz 4.0
Sense UI 4.0
Stock Android

Front Camera
1.9MP / 720p
1.3 MP / 720p
1.3 MP / 720p

Back Camera
8MP / 1080p
8MP / 1080p @ 24fps
5MP / 1080p

Battery
Lithium Ion 2100 mAh
Lithium Pro 1800mAh
Lithium Ion 1750mAh
The Samsung Galaxy S III completed the SunSpider benchmark in 1505ms which is the fastest we've seen on any phone and by a large margin. The One X completed that test in 2004ms. Even in other benchmarks such as GLBenchmark and Quadrant, the Galaxy S III
UI and Apps
Like most of the other top-tier phone manufacturers, Samsung adds their own UI on top of Android’s stock UI and I can see how this is has become more of a necessity for a manufacturer to differentiate their Android based phone from other competitors. Samsung calls their UI TouchWiz and on it’s 4th iteration, it is a lot less obtrusive than some of the previous versions which is a good thing as I wasn’t the biggest fan of TouchWiz.
Samsung brings quite a set of features with the Galaxy S III, some which are interesting while others will probably not be used much. The one I liked most is Smart Stay which, using the front camera on the device, tracks to see if you are looking at the screen or not and if you are, it prevents the screen from shutting off- a complain that I have with almost every other Smartphone.
Another new feature and this is purely aimed at Siri is S-Voice that tries to make your phone more usable using your voice. With my tests, it worked well at times but failed miserably quite a few times as well. Also borrowed from iPhone is double-tap to top which takes you to the top of a list. One more semi-useful feature is Social Tagging where the camera tried to recognize faces from a picture you take from the camera. I say semi-useful because it wouldn’t always recognize faces in a picture.
Other less-usable features on the Galaxy S III include Direct Call which calls the person you are texting when you raise the phone to your ear, Smart Alert that vibrates the phone after you have picked it from not using it for a while to let you know if there are any pending notifications and Touch Beam which shares media with another Galaxy Phone using NFC.
Camera
The Camera on the Galaxy S III takes decent pictures but nothing outstanding in my tests. If the subject is still and there is plenty of light, you will get some really good pictures however, picturing my daughter in a play area always resulted in a blurry shot.Also low-light and night time pictures appear a bit grainy. I’m not sure if I’ve been spoiled by the Nokia 808 PureView or not but I feel that the camera on the Galaxy S III is not as good as the iPhone 4S or the HTC One X.
Conclusion
Wrapping things off, Samsung has done good by providing a pretty high capacity battery with the Galaxy S III. The 2100 mAh battery certainly has more capacity than the 1800mAh one found in HTC’s One X or even Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus that comes equipped with 1750mAh. This definitely makes the Galaxy S III last longer than the two devices I mentioned and I was frequently getting almost two days worth of usage. The only other Android based phone that has managed to do so is the Motorola RAZR Max with it’s massive 3300mAh battery that comes at the expense of making that phone a bit heavy at 145g.
So is the Samsung Galaxy S III the best Android handset currently available? The answer to that depends of your preferences. If you want something that is super fast then there is no denying that the S III smokes everything else. There are also many little features like Smart Stay that you will not find on other devices and TouchWiz as a UI has certainly come a long way.
However, there are three areas where the Galaxy S III loses out to the HTC One X- the screen, the camera and the construction quality. So, again, it really really depends on what you're looking for when choosing an Android phone. Also keep in mind that Google has announced Jelly Bean (Android 4.1) which will be available on the Galaxy Nexus this month- probably much before any other device gets it and the Galaxy Nexus can be picked for almost a thousand Dirhams less than the Galaxy S III at the moment.
In short, while the Galaxy S III is an excellent phone and better than all other Android phones at certain levels, it is not the definite Android device to get that the Galaxy S II proved to be a year back.

Ted takes the weekend box office

Ted took the number one spot in this weekend’s U.S. box office battle.
The R-rated movie starring Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis brought in an impressive $54.1 million over the three-day weekend.
It exceeded predictions and is now the highest domestic opening for an original R-rated comedy – a title which was previously held by The Hangover’s 2009 debut with $45 million.
Raunchy stripper movie Magic Mike didn’t disappoint in its second place offering as it brought in a respectable $39 million.
Disney Pixar’s Brave came in third but grossed over $34 million its second week in theatres.
Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection also over-performed with $26.3 million landing in fourth place despite only being in 2,161 screens.
Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted came in fifth with $11.8 million in its fourth week out.
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter fell down to the sixth spot with $6 million. Prometheus dropped to seventh with $4.9 million.
Meanwhile Moonrise Kingdom went back up to number eight with $4.8 million and Snow White and the Huntsman was ninth with $4.4 million in takings.
However, family comedy People Like Us starring Elizabeth Banks and Michelle Pfeiffer failed to find an audience and only scraped in $4.3 million in its opening weekend landing in tenth place.

Ted took the number one spot in this weekend’s U.S. box office battle.
The R-rated movie starring Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis brought in an impressive $54.1 million over the three-day weekend.
It exceeded predictions and is now the highest domestic opening for an original R-rated comedy – a title which was previously held by The Hangover’s 2009 debut with $45 million.
Raunchy stripper movie Magic Mike didn’t disappoint in its second place offering as it brought in a respectable $39 million.
Disney Pixar’s Brave came in third but grossed over $34 million its second week in theatres.
Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection also over-performed with $26.3 million landing in fourth place despite only being in 2,161 screens.
Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted came in fifth with $11.8 million in its fourth week out.
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter fell down to the sixth spot with $6 million. Prometheus dropped to seventh with $4.9 million.
Meanwhile Moonrise Kingdom went back up to number eight with $4.8 million and Snow White and the Huntsman was ninth with $4.4 million in takings.
However, family comedy People Like Us starring Elizabeth Banks and Michelle Pfeiffer failed to find an audience and only scraped in $4.3 million in its opening weekend landing in tenth place.

7 Top Health Risks for Men Over 40

During midlife and beyond, men's leading causes of death include familiar standbys: heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, stroke, diabetes, respiratory disease, suicide, and Alzheimer's disease.
To lessen your odds of dying from these killers, curb the critical habits that lead to them.
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10 surprisingly cheap European cities

Europe is the world's most expensive continent for U.S. travelers to visit; this probably doesn't shock anyone who's ventured across the Pond.

Tired of spending layovers in an airport?  Download Yahoo! TimeTraveler on your iPhone to create custom itineraries based on your location and amount of time you have to spend.


You might be surprised, though, to discover which cities in Europe are remarkably affordable places to vacation. We analyzed the costs of hotel stays, meals, airfares, and activities in popular European destinations to find out which spots offer the best value for the euros and pounds.

Here are 10 cities in Europe where budget-minded travelers can find low-cost hotel rooms, free activities, and travel bargains galore.

Prague

Despite its popularity, this thousand-year-old city is one of Europe's more economical destinations. According to our sister site TripAdvisor's TripIndex, Prague is the 20th-most affordable world destination—that's not bad, considering that Prague is the fifth-most visited European city. Average prices for one night's stay and activities, says TripAdvisor, come to about $248 for two people.

Plus, the city has enough free sites to keep a traveler busy for quite the stretch: No-cost attractions include the Havelska flower market, the picture-perfect Charles Bridge, and the 10th-century castle that towers over the city, Vysehrad. Gather amidst the crowd in the Old Town square to hear the striking of the famous clock during daylight hours—it's free.
Dublin

It's as easy to find an affordable hotel in Dublin as it is to come across a good foamy pint. Failte Ireland features a collection of two-night minibreaks, which include accommodations and breakfast for two people, starting at €75 per person (about $94 USD) at various local hotels and B&Bs. And you can find a helpful roundup of hotels for less than $150 per night on The New York Times' website. Moreover, Dublin is brimming with free, worthy attractions, including the National Museum of Ireland, the National Botanic Gardens, and the Irish Museum of Modern Art.

Getting to Dublin from the U.S. is quite affordable, too. International budget carrier Aer Lingus makes Dublin, its main gateway, a very inexpensive European hub to fly into. The carrier often features very competitive fare sales, especially during colder months. We've seen round-trip fares from the U.S. to Dublin drop below $500 in the low season and under $1,000 during the high season in summer.

Warsaw

Predictably, your dollars will generally go further in Eastern European cities than they would on the western side of the continent. But out of all the urban centers in Eastern Europe, one city stands out as a haven for travelers seeking luxurious accommodations at bargain-basement prices. According to the Hotel Price Index from Hotels.com, Poland's capital offers the most luxurious hotels for the lowest prices in the world. A five-star property in Warsaw cost, on average, $130 per night in 2011.

In addition, Warsaw ranks as one of the top world cities offering the best overall value for hotels costing an average of $100 per night. For example, weekend stays cost as little as €65 per night at Polonia Palace Hotel, an opulent early 20th-century property that was the only hotel in Warsaw to survive World War II completely undamaged.

Rome

Rome is one of the most visited places in Europe, yet—unlike Paris or London—the city is an astonishingly budget-friendly vacation spot. At $190, average nightly hotel rates in Rome are cheaper than most other major tourist destinations in Italy, and they fall well below those in the aforementioned European hot spots.

Additionally, since Rome is the biggest international hub in The Boot, airfares to the city are often much cheaper than fares to other Italian destinations. Flights from New York to Rome in October start at $688 round trip, according to Kayak. Compare this to Venice ($740 round trip), Florence ($934 round trip), or Naples ($753 round trip).
Lisbon

Portugal is, overall, a less expensive place to visit than neighboring Spain. The country's capital city, Lisbon, is no exception, yet it offers ample attractions on par with top European spots: sweeping sea views, cosmopolitan beaches, ancient cobblestoned streets, Gothic cathedrals. The cost of a night's stay in a four-star hotel averages $130, according to TripAdvisor. In addition, The New York Times reports that many Lisbon cultural attractions offer free admission on Sundays, including the Museu Nacional de Arqueologia and the Torre de Belem, a historical fortress.

Budapest

According to TripAdvisor's annual TripIndex survey, a comparison of prices for accommodations and activities in cities, Budapest is the most affordable city for U.S. travelers in all of Europe. Reports TripAdvisor, the cost for "a one-night stay in a four-star hotel, one cocktail per person, a two-course dinner with a bottle of wine, and round-trip taxi transportation" is $194 in Budapest.

We found nightly rates at Hotel Palazzo Zichy, a popular property that's ranked number two of 333 Budapest hotels on TripAdvisor, as low as €59 per night. That's for a stay during the summer high season, no less.
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